The diversified uses of biological samples

As a reminder of how diversified the collection and use of biological samples is, I recommend a paper by Takako Tsujimura-Ito, Yusuke Inoue (currently a guest researcher at CRB), and Ken-ichi Yoshida:

Departments of forensic medicine obtain samples from autopsies in order to secure evidence that can be used in court. These samples, often whole organs, typically need to be stored for long periods, since cases sometimes require re-examination of the evidence. The samples are stored also for secondary use in research advancing both clinical and forensic medicine.

The problem addressed in the paper concerns the communication with bereaved families. Families are often not contacted by the forensic departments in Japan, since such contacts can be seen to threaten the neutrality of the evaluation of the evidence.

Emphasizing that stored samples from autopsies benefit bereaved families, patients and society as a whole, the paper recommends more effective ways of communicating with families, to avoid damage to public confidence when families inadvertently get to know that samples from deceased family members are stored or used in research.

Pär Segerdahl

We recommend readings - the Ethics Blog

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