The Ethics Blog

A blog from the Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics (CRB)

Tag: ethical review (Page 1 of 2)

Speaking to 5-year-olds about research (By Sara Frygner-Holm)

How should we talk to children about research? And how should we go about recruiting them to studies? For children to become research participants, their parents must consent. Regulation states children should also give assent themselves, to as great extent as possible. Our ethics committees require us to provide them with age-appropriate information. Health care […]

Internal investigation of research misconduct often fails

What characterizes a research scandal? In a short article in Hastings Center Report, Carl Elliott uses as an example the case of Paolo Macchiarini at the Swedish Karolinska Institutet. Macchiarini’s deadly experiments with stem cell-covered artificial trachea, transplanted to patients who did not have life-threatening diseases, have unique features linked to the personality and charisma […]

Research ethics is not only protection ethics

Systems for ethical review of research would never have been developed if it were not for the need to protect research participants from being exploited, exposed to excessive risks, or injured. Considering how several research scandals strengthened this protection motive, it is easy to believe that protection is the sole aim of research ethics. This […]

Macchiarini and the spirit of fraudulence

I assume you heard of Paolo Macchiarini, the “star surgeon” who, with the willpower of a general, simply would win a great battle at the frontline of research – by creating new tracheae using the patients’ own stem cells. That the endeavor had costs in terms of a few soldiers’ or patients’ lives is sad, […]

Online course in research ethics, spring 2016

Anyone who manages research also needs to be able to reflect on research. Not only the researchers themselves, but also funding bodies, journal editors, members of research ethics committees, administrators, journalists, organizations, politicians, and others. How do you act if you suspect research misconduct, and what is it? What are the ethical and legal regulations […]

Articles may be retracted if ethics is neglected

When a scientific article is retracted, it means that the article should never have been published and that data and conclusions from the study should not be used to underpin future research. Articles are often retracted when it is found that the authors acted fraudulently. They may have been careless, or cheated, or have plagiarized […]

Ethics research keeps ethical practices alive (new dissertation)

I have in two posts complained about a tendency of ethical practices to begin to idle, as if they were ends in themselves. A risk with the tendency is that bioethics is discredited and attacked as no more than an unhappy hindrance to novel research. Like when Steven Pinker recently wrote that the primary moral goal […]

Rare diseases need international research infrastructure

There are a few thousand diseases that you never heard the name of. They affect so few people and have no names in the common language. These diseases are usually called rare diseases (or orphan diseases). They often (but not always) have genetic origin. They often affect children, are disabling and can even be life-threatening, and […]

Biobank news: ethics and law

The second issue of the newsletter from CRB and BBMRI.se is now available: Biobank perspectives: current issues in biobank ethics and law This April issue contains four interesting news items about: New international research cooperation on genetic risk information. The new Swedish law on registers for research on heritage, environment and health. The legislative process […]

Research ethics as moral assurance system

Modern society seems to be driven by skepticism. As philosophers systematically doubted the senses by enumerating optical and other illusions, our human ability to think for ourselves and take responsibility for our professional activities is doubted by enumerating scandals and cases of misconduct in the past. The logic is simple: Since human practices have a […]

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