The Ethics Blog

A blog from the Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics (CRB)

Tag: health care costs

Thesis on reproductive ethics

On Thursday, February 28, Amal Matar defends her thesis in the field of reproductive ethics. As genetic tests become cheaper and more reliable, the potential use of genetic tests also expands. One use could be offering preconception genetic screening to entire populations. Prospective parents could find out if they are carriers of the same recessive […]

Swedish policymakers on genetic screening before pregnancy

Some genetic diseases do not develop in  the child unless both parents happen to have the same gene. Parents can be healthy and unaware that they have the same non-dominant disease gene. In these cases, the risk that their child develops the disease is 25 percent. Preconception expanded carrier screening could be offered to entire […]

Commercialization, but not at any price

In a previous post, I tried to make the point that the pharmaceutical industry can support altruism between research participants and patients, despite the fact that the industry itself is not altruistic but is driven by profit. Medical research will not benefit patients, unless results are developed into commercially available treatments. However, this presupposes, of […]

Is it ethical that uninformed members of the public decide just how bad your disability is? (By Terry Flynn)

Last time I raised the possibility of changing child health policy because teenagers are more likely than adults to view mental health impairments as being the worst type of disability. However, today I consider adults only in order to address a more fundamental issue. Imagine you had an uncommon, but not rare, incurable disease that […]

The voices of telenursing

I believe that many who call a telenurse are wondering which voice they will encounter. Will it be considerate or dismissive? Male or female? Young or old? Sympathetic or unsympathetic? I guess also the telenurse is wondering which voice he or (usually) she will encounter when answering the call. Will it be self-assertive or self-denying? […]

Solidarity and biobanking

The concept of solidarity is currently receiving attention in bioethics and inspires new approaches to ethical problems. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics recently published a report – Solidarity: reflections on an emerging concept in bioethics – initiating the development of a systematic solidarity framework for approaching difficult ethical questions in biobanking, biosecurity and health inequalities. […]

Extended deadline for Researcher in Health Economics: January 7, 2013

Ethical questions about health care and medical research often require empirical input, to make arguments valid for real conditions. Many of the future issues that engage us at CRB need empirical basis in so called Discrete Choice Experiments (DCE). We are therefore recruiting a researcher with a doctoral degree in health economics and documented skills […]

Research for the sake of the patient

We regularly tell strangers about sensitive aspects of our lives. We do it every time we visit the doctor. We do it without hesitating, in spite of the fact that the information won’t stay with the doctor to whom we give it. The information is archived and will be read by health care staff in […]

Interactive conference seeks the value of biobanking

I have the privilege of belonging to a group of ethicists and law scholars that currently discuss how to visualize ethical and legal dimensions of biobanking. We organize an interactive part of the scientific conference program for HandsOn: Biobanks in September. The conference invites participants to Uppsala to explore the values of biobanking and to […]

The economisation of the language of medicine

Two American physicians recently wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine about how they were forced back to school again learning another foreign language. In medical school they learned that measles was called rubeola and itching pruritus. Today they learn that patient is called “customer” (or “consumer”) while doctor and nurse both are called […]

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