The Ethics Blog

A blog from the Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics (CRB)

Tag: integrity (Page 1 of 3)

Speaking to 5-year-olds about research (By Sara Frygner-Holm)

How should we talk to children about research? And how should we go about recruiting them to studies? For children to become research participants, their parents must consent. Regulation states children should also give assent themselves, to as great extent as possible. Our ethics committees require us to provide them with age-appropriate information. Health care […]

Global data sharing, national oversight bodies

Science has an international character and global research collaboration is common. For medical research, this means that health data and biological samples linked to people in one nation often are transferred to researchers in other nations. At the same time, the development of new information and communication technology increases the importance of people’s data protection […]

Ethics, human rights and responsible innovation

It is difficult to predict the consequences of developing and using new technologies. We interact with smart devices and intelligent software on an almost daily basis. Some of us use prosthetics and implants to go about our business and most of us will likely live to see self-driving cars. In the meantime, Swedish research shows […]

More biobank perspectives

If you did not get your fill during the Europe biobank week in Vienna, we give you more biobank related news in the latest issue of Biobank Perspectives, our newsletter on current issues in biobank ethics and law. This time, Moa Kindström Dahlin describes what BBMRI-ERIC’s new federated Helpdesk for ELSI-issues can offer. We also […]

Identifying individuals while protecting privacy

Research ethics is complex and requires considering issues from several perspectives simultaneously. I’ve written about the temptation to reduce research ethics to pure protection ethics. Then not as much needs to be kept in mind. Protection is the sole aim, and thinking begins to resemble the plot of an adventure film where the hero finally […]

Notebook, not Facebook

I take the liberty of striking a blow for the notebook. I miss the voices people develop when they use to keep their own notes. The conversation with yourself gives depth – “I have thought about this” – to your conversation with others. The erosion of collegial structures at universities is worrisome. But what especially […]

Critique of the motivation for dynamic consent to biobank research

Biobank research has undeniably challenged research ethics and the requirement for informed consent. We are after all dealing with collection of biological samples for future, yet unspecified research. Thus, one cannot give donors specific information about the research in which their samples will be used. It might seem like asking them to consent to unknown […]

Second issue of our newsletter about biobanks

Now you can read the second newsletter this year from CRB and BBMRI.se: Biobank perspectives: current issues in biobank ethics and law The newsletter contains four news items: 1. Anna-Sara Lind presents a new book, Information and Law in Transition, and the contributions to the book by CRB researchers. 2. Anna-Sara Lind describes the situation […]

The Swedish Data Protection Authority rejects extension of temporary law on registry research

Since the new Swedish law on research databases is delayed, there is a proposal to extend the current temporary law on certain registries for research about what heredity and environment mean for human health (until December 31, 2017). The Swedish Data Protection Authority rejects extension, because major deficiencies noted previously have not been addressed and […]

Experts on assignment in the real world

Experts on assignment in the real world cease in part to be experts. Just consider computer experts who create a computer system for the tax authorities, or for a bank, or for a hospital. In order for these systems to work on location, the computer experts need to be open to what they don’t know […]

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