Unhappy approach behind policy for incidental findings

Should individual research participants be informed if biobank researchers incidentally discover increased genetic disease risks through analysis of their samples?

At a seminar, Jennifer Viberg recently discussed a well-known recommendation for when participants should be informed about incidental findings:

During the seminar it became increasingly clear how the authors of the recommendation were proceeding. They started out from how one already handles incidental findings in a more familiar field, namely, imaging studies of the internal organs of the human body. They then generalized that policy to the less familiar case of genomic biobank research.

When researchers produce images of the internal organs of the human body they may accidentally discover, for example, tumors in individual research participants. It is obvious that participants should be contacted about such findings so that action can be taken.

The problem when one generalizes from a field with developed policy to a less familiar field, however, is the risk that false analogies govern the generalized policy. By treating imaging studies as paradigm case of individual findings, it might look as if biobank researchers produce images; images of the genome that incidentally reveal individual divergences against which action can be taken – like when a tumor is operated.

The article does not emphasize the fact that incidental findings in biobank research more typically would concern highly complex and difficult to interpret information about increased individual genetic disease risks.

If I have a tumor, it exists within my body and it can be surgically removed. But if I have an increased genetic disease risk, what do I have and in what sense can it be removed? Does “actionability” have the same meaning for diseases and for increased disease risks?

These and related questions about differences are not emphasized in the article. On the contrary, one seems to be in a hurry to generalize a familiar routine to a new field.

Transferring lessons from familiar to less familiar fields seems reasonable. If one neglects the one-way nature of the approach, however, it easily inflicts blindness to essential differences. In her dissertation work, Jennifer Viberg wants to avoid this pitfall.

Pär Segerdahl

We challenge habits of thought : the Ethics Blog

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