Ethical principles causing moral hallucinations

I want to continue the discussion in my previous blog post. It concerned an article raising the question whether researchers in genomics have a duty to actively look for incidental findings.

Joanna Forsberg aptly remarked that the notion of looking for findings that one isn’t looking for is strange. She also pointed out that healthcare doesn’t have a duty to look for incidental findings:

  • “In fact, in the context of healthcare incidental findings are (in general) deliberately avoided, by not doing tests when there is no clinical reason to do them. Is the duty of care more extensive in biobank research?”

This pertinent remark ought to worry ethicists. How can the ethical debate have reached a point where it is asked if researchers have duties to provide more healthcare than healthcare itself?

I couldn’t free myself from this problem that Joanna’s remark revealed.

I now believe it has do with the professionalization of ethics. It has become the ethicists’ professional duty to apply ethical principles to medical research. This works tolerably as long as it is possible to identify the traits that make the principles applicable. The application of the principle of beneficence, for example, presupposes that one can identify beneficial traits.

The reason why incidental findings in biobank research are debated so hotly, it seems to me, is precisely the difficulty of identifying traits in this complex terrain to which relevant ethical principles are applicable. Ethicists try hard to find aspects of genetic risk information and participation in biobank research that would make it possible to apply the principles of

  • respect for persons
  • beneficence
  • non-maleficence
  • reciprocity

so that the ethicists can fulfill their professional duty to guide biobankers by proposing an ethical policy for incidental findings.

The risk, however, when ethical principles are applied in desperation precisely because their application is unclear is that the principles begin to steer the description of reality… and to such an extent that they make us hallucinate moral duties.

I think that Joanna’s remark should act as a reminder of that risk.

Pär Segerdahl

We challenge habits of thought : the Ethics Blog

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