The Ethics Blog

A blog from the Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics (CRB)

Tag: patient-doctor relationship (Page 2 of 3)

Did medicine save the life of ethics?

About thirty-five years ago, Stephen Toulmin wrote an article on the topic: How medicine saved the life of ethics. I think it is still worth reading. Toulmin argued roughly as follows: During the first six decades of the 1900s, ethics wasn’t feeling well at all. One might say that it suffered from moral aphasia: it […]

Physicians’ experiences of do-not-resuscitate orders

Critically ill patients sometimes have such a poor prognosis that cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiac arrest (CPR) would not help. They are so weak that they would not survive the treatment. If they survive, they do so with even poorer quality of life. The physician can then write a so-called DNR decision, which means that CPR […]

Macchiarini and the spirit of fraudulence

I assume you heard of Paolo Macchiarini, the “star surgeon” who, with the willpower of a general, simply would win a great battle at the frontline of research – by creating new tracheae using the patients’ own stem cells. That the endeavor had costs in terms of a few soldiers’ or patients’ lives is sad, […]

Ethical questions raised by experiencing another culture (By Amal Matar)

When I first moved to Sweden, I was pretty excited to explore a new country and experience Swedish culture and life. In many ways I had not expected the extent of the difference between what I was familiar with and Swedish culture. I assumed, naively, that I would be in a familiar setting because I […]

Culturally sensitive ethics

Health care receives patients from many different cultures and health care professionals are encouraged to be sensitive to patients’ cultural background. But what is a culture? What is it one should be sensitive to? Last week, CRB organized a workshop on Islamic perspectives on reproductive ethics. A case that was discussed was this: an unmarried […]

Dissertation on palliative care of children with cancer

Approximately every fifth child who gets cancer in Sweden dies from their disease. In her dissertation work at CRB, Li Jalmsell studied the care of these children at the end of their life from both the child’s and the parents’ and siblings’ perspectives. One of her findings is that one doesn’t generally recognize that the […]

Idling normativity

I recently wrote about the tendency of ethical practices to lose their vital functions and degenerate into empty rituals. Why is there such a tendency? The tendency is not unique to ethics: it is everywhere. Suddenly, patients and students are to be called “customers” and be treated “as” customers. This can be perceived as an […]

Direct to consumer genetic tests: soon history?

More and more companies are selling genetic tests directly to consumers. You don’t need a prescription. Just go online and order a test and you’ll get a cotton swab with which you scrape the inside of your cheek. You then send the cotton swab to a laboratory and await the answer: What do your genes […]

Conversations with seemingly unconscious patients

Research and technology changes us: changes the way we live, speak and think. One area of ​​research that will change us in the future is brain research. Here are some remarkable discoveries about some seemingly unconscious patients; discoveries that we still don’t know how to make intelligible or relate to. A young woman survived a […]

The voices of telenursing

I believe that many who call a telenurse are wondering which voice they will encounter. Will it be considerate or dismissive? Male or female? Young or old? Sympathetic or unsympathetic? I guess also the telenurse is wondering which voice he or (usually) she will encounter when answering the call. Will it be self-assertive or self-denying? […]

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