The Ethics Blog

A blog from the Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics (CRB)

Tag: infrastructure

Neuroethical reflection in the Human Brain Project

The emergence of several national level brain initiatives and the priority given to neuroscientific research make it important to examine the values underpinning the research, and to address the ethical, social, legal, philosophical, and regulatory issues that it raises. Neuroscientific insights allow us to understand more about the human brain: about its dynamic nature and […]

Open data access is regulated access

We usually associate open access with the publication of scientific articles that anyone with internet access can read, without price barrier. The concept “open access” is now being used also for research data. I have written about this trend towards open data earlier on the Ethics Blog: Openness as a norm. In many cases, research […]

Building European infrastructures for research

The European Union is traditionally about creating an internal market, where goods, services, labor and capital can move freely between member states. Lately there have been efforts to create also European infrastructures for research, where researchers in the different member states can collaborate more efficiently, and compete on a global “research market.” A new tool […]

An obligation to look for incidental findings in genomics research?

A new article in The American Journal of Bioethics attempts to take the discussion about incidental findings in genomics research a step further by asking: “Assuming there is a duty to disclose significant incidental findings, might there be an obligation for researchers to actively look for these findings?” The authors use an ancillary care model […]

UK Biobank invites researchers

After many years of data collection, UK Biobank is now open for research on human health and disease. Like the Swedish biobank investment LifeGene, the British investment is big and prospective. Blood and urine samples were collected from 500 000 participants aged 40-69. Participants also underwent medical examinations and answered questions about health, disease and lifestyle. […]